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l May 2004 l

The Kashmir Bachao Andolan Publication

l Vol 4, No 1 l

E D I T O R ' S   C H O I C E

Film review of "Sheen"
Mayank Shekhar

*YUCK **WHATEVER ***GOOD ****SUPER *****AWESOME

Gone-a-sheen!

A scene from Sheen

 

 

 

 SHEEN*1/2
 Dir: Ashok Pandit
 Cast: Raj Babbar, Sheen

Sheen is set in the late ’80s/early ’90s when an indoctrinated breed of foreign-sponsored and domestically brainwashed jehadis unleashed violence for the first time in the Kashmir Valley.

The first targets of the pogrom, touted as Kashmir’s freedom movement, were the resident Kashmiri ‘Pandits’ — Hindus — natural adversaries in a Muslim-majority state that Pakistan stakes claim to on the basis of a ‘two-religion, two-nation’ theory.

The point of the picture is actually perfect for a feature-film-based reportage on the plight of J&K’s displaced Hindus who bear the tag of refugees (an obvious misnomer) within their own country. The trouble here however is the tacky treatment. Also, that the film never moves beyond the obvious chest thumping premise.

The cinematic construct for one, looks closest to a technically deficient, badly lit, poorly picturised (mostly in long-shot) North Indian regional films. To top this fatigue, you are expected to test your patience with the world’s worst actors hamming away to glory (note their flying hand movements).

This amateur theatre production incidentally is led by a shifty teacher Pandit (Babbar), who keeps shifting between a Kashmiri and a regular accent. Pandit is the last Hindu man standing in the Valley along with wife (Kiran Joneja) and daughter (Sheen) who’s in love with a bumbler who appears for commercial breaks every few minutes over a quarter dozen dream sequences.

The only unintentional hilarity worth recommendation in this TV series episode that’s mistakenly entered the cinema is a pot-bellied news channel editor who urges Pandit to burn homes so that he can get “visually breaking news”! Whatever, man.

Good intentions alone do not necessarily translate to good cinema.  This is an apt example of that unfortunate case.

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